janet wyman Coleman
 

So you’re interested in spies....



In "Secrets, Lies, Gizmos, and Spies, A History of Spies and Espionage," you will read about believable and unbelievable spies, covert operations, spy tunnels and aircraft spying from above, camera-toting pigeons, weapons disguised as umbrellas and lipsticks, and much more. Do heroes and traitors fascinate you? Spies are both. If an Iranian spies for America, is he a hero or a traitor? George Washington was a spy master at a time when it was considered highly ungentlemanly to spy. Elizabeth Van Lew sent secret messages to the Union generals written on onion skins during the Civil War. In 1946, the Russians presented a gift to the American ambassador: a carving of the seal of the U.S. with a listening device below the eagle's beak. The history of espionage is filled with many stories of great ingenuity, heroism, and betrayal. It's a puzzling world which has affected our history more than we know. (“Secrets, Lies, Gizmos, and Spies” was published by Harry N. Abrams, Inc. in 2006.)



                                                      

                                                      Awards & Reviews

                             2006 Gold Award from National Parenting Publications

                           Nominated for the American Library Association's

                                        Best Books for Young Adults, 2007.


"The world of espionage is exposed in this captivating overview...The breadth of coverage on a subject inherently interesting to kids will easily draw plenty of interest. Kids may return to their history books with new enthusiasm, and the moral questions will open discussion about the business of spying." Booklist


"The engrossing, readable text will hold the interest of even reluctant readers." School Library Journal

In the early  years of the FBI, agents who fought gangsters were called

G-men.

COLLECTION OF THE

INTERNATIONAL SPY MUSEUM,

WASHINGTON, D.C.

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